INDIAN AFFAIRS: LAWS AND TREATIES

Vol. I, Laws     (Compiled to December 1, 1902)

Compiled and edited by Charles J. Kappler. Washington : Government Printing Office, 1904.


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PART III.—EXECUTIVE ORDERS RELATING TO INDIAN RESERVES.
Arizona | California | Colorado | Idaho | Indian Territory | Iowa | Kansas | Michigan | Minnesota | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Mexico | North Dakota | Oklahoma | Oregon | South Dakota | Utah | Washington | Wisconsin | Wyoming

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NEW MEXICO

Bosque Redondo Reserve.
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
Office of Indian Affairs, January 14, 1864.

SIR:     My attention has been called by Superintendent Steck, of New Mexico, to the necessity of designating a tract of land in New Mexico 40 miles square, with Bosque Redondo as the center, as a reservation for the Apache Indians.

In a former letter to this office, a copy of which was transmitted to you with report thereon, under date of December 16, 1863, Superintendent Steck speaks of the proposed reservation as well adapted to Indian purposes, for a limited number. Mr. Steck estimates the number of Apaches to be about 3,000, and the quantity of arable land within the boundaries of the proposed reservation at not exceeding 6,000 acres. Surveyor-General Clark, of New Mexico, in a letter to Mr. Steck, a copy of which was transmitted to you with the report before mentioned, makes the same estimate as to the quantity of arable land within 40 miles square, with Bosque Redondo as a center.

Owing to the fact that the arable land lies along the water courses it seems to be necessary that the area of the reservation should be as large as that proposed by Mr. Steck in order to suitably accommodate the estimated number of Apaches, and isolate them as far as possible from the whites.

For the reasons given by Mr. Steck in his letter before referred to, as well as for those given in his annual report for 1863, to both of which reference is had, should you concur in the propriety of reserving the tract of land mentioned for the use of the Apaches, I would respectfully recommend that the subject be laid before the President, with the recommendation that the same may be withheld from pre-emption and settlement, and under his proclamation be set apart for Indian purposes.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
WILLIAM P. DOLE, Commissioner.

Hon. JOHN P. USHER,
      Secretary of the Interior.

[First indorsement.]

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, January 15, 1864.

Respectfully laid before the President, with the recommendation that the reservation be set apart for the purposes herein indicated.

J. P. USHER, Secretary.

[Second indorsement.]

Approved January 15, 1864.

A. LINCOLN.

(See report of General Land Office for 1873, page 103, and act of Congress approved February 24, 1871 (16 Stats., page 34), relative to its abandonment.)


Fort Stanton Indian Reserve. (Mescalero Apache.)
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
Office of Indian Affairs, May 23, 1873.

The above diagram is intended to show a proposed reservation for the Mescalero band of Apache Indians in New Mexico; said proposed

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reservation is indicated on the diagram by the red lines bordered with yellow, and is described as follows, viz:

Commencing at the southwest corner of the Fort Stanton reduced military reservation, and running thence due south to a point on the hills near the north bank of the Rio Rindoso; thence along said hills to a point above the settlements; thence across said river to a point on the opposite hills, and thence to the same line upon which we start from Fort Stanton; and thence due south to the thirty-third degree north latitude; thence to the top of the Sacramento Mountains, and along the top of said mountains to the top of the White Mountains; thence along the top of said mountains to the headwaters of the Rio Nogal, to a point opposite the starting point, and thence to the starting point.

I respectfully recommend that the President be requested to order that the land comprised within the above-described limits be withheld from entry and settlement as public lands, and that the same be set apart as an Indian reservation, as indicated in my report to the Department of this date.

EDW. P. SMITH, Commissioner.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, May 26, 1873.

Respectfully presented to the President, with the recommendation that he make the order above proposed by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

C. DELANO, Secretary.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 29, 1873.

It is hereby ordered that the tract of country above described be withheld from entry and settlement as public lands, and that the same be set apart as a reservation for the Mescalero Apache Indians, as recommended by the Secretary of the Interior and Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, February 2, 1874.

In lieu of an Executive order dated the 29th day of May last, setting apart certain lands in New Mexico as a reservation for the Mescalero Apaches, which order is hereby canceled, it is hereby ordered that there be withdrawn for sale or other disposition, and set apart for the use of said Mescalero Apaches and such other Indians as the Department may see fit to locate thereon, the tract of country in New Mexico (except so much thereof as is embraced in the Fort Stanton reduced military reservation) bounded as follows, viz:

Beginning at the most northerly point of the Fort Stanton reduced military reservation; thence due west to the summit of the Sierra Blanca Mountains; thence due south to the thirty-third degree north latitude; thence due east to a point due south of the most easterly point of the said Fort Stanton reduced military reservation; thence due north to the southern boundary of township 11; thence due west to the southwest corner of township 11, in range 13; thence due north to the second correction line south; thence due east along said line to a point opposite the line running north from the thirty-third degree north latitude; thence due north to the most easterly point of said Fort Stanton reduced military reservation; thence along the northeastern boundary of said military reservation to the place of beginning.

U. S. GRANT.


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EXECUTIVE MANSION, October 20, 1875.

In lieu of Executive order dated February 2, 1874, setting apart certain lands in New Mexico as a reservation for the Mescalero Apaches, which order is hereby canceled, it is hereby ordered that there be withdrawn from sale or other disposition, and set apart for the use of said Mescalero Apaches, and such other Indians as the Department may see fit to locate thereon, the tract of country in New Mexico (except so much thereof as is embraced in the Fort Stanton reduced military reservation) bounded as follows:

Beginning at the most northerly point of the Fort Stanton reduced military reservation; running thence due west to a point due north of the northeast corner of township 14 south, range 10 east; thence due south along the eastern boundary of said township to the thirty-third degree north latitude; thence due east on said parallel to a point due south of the most easterly point of the said Fort Stanton reduced military reservation; thence due north to the southern boundary of township 11; thence due west to the southwest corner of township 11, in range 13; thence due north to the second correction line south; thence due east along said line to a point opposite the line running north from the thirty-third degree north latitude; thence due north to the most easterly point of said Fort Stanton reduced military reservation; thence along the northeastern boundary of said military reservation to the place of beginning.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 19, 1882.

In lieu of Executive order dated October 20, 1875, setting apart certain lands in New Mexico as a reservation for the Mescalero Apaches, which order is hereby canceled, it is hereby ordered that there be withdrawn from sale or other disposition, and set apart for the use of the said Mescalero Apaches and such other Indians as the Department may see fit to locate thereon, the tract of country in New Mexico bounded as follows:

Beginning at the northeast corner of township 12 south, range 16 east of the principal meridian in New Mexico; thence west along the north boundary of township 12 south, ranges 16, 15, 14, and 13 east, to the southeast corner of township 11 south, range 12 east; thence north along the east boundary of said township to the second correction line south; thence west along said correction line to the northwest corner of township 11 south, range 11 east; thence south along the range line between ranges 10 and 11 east to the southwest corner of township 12 south, range 11 east; thence east along the south boundary of said township to the southeast corner thereof; thence south along the range line between ranges 11 and 12 east to the thirty-third degree of north latitude, as established and marked on the ground by First Lieut. L. H. Walker, Fifteenth Infantry, U. S. Army, in compliance with Special Orders No. 100, Series of 1875, Headquarters, District of New Mexico; thence east along said thirty-third degree of north latitude to its intersection with the range line between ranges 16 and 17 east; thence north along said range line to the place of beginning.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


Executive MANSION, March 24, 1883.

In lieu of Executive order dated May 19, 1882, setting apart certain lands in New Mexico as a reservation for the Mescalero Apaches, which order is hereby canceled, it is hereby ordered that there be withdrawn from sale or other disposition and set apart for the use of the

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said Mescalero Apaches and such other Indians as the Secretary of the Interior may see fit to locate thereon, the tract of country in New Mexico bounded as follows:

Beginning at the northeast corner of township 12 south, range 16 east of the principal meridian in New Mexico; thence west along the north boundary of township 12 south, ranges 16, 15, 14, and 13 east to the southeast corner of township 11 south, range 12 east; thence north along the east boundary of said township to the second correction line south; thence west along said correction line 12 miles; thence south 12 miles; thence east 6 miles; thence south to the thirty-third degrees of north latitude, as established and marked on the ground by First Lieut. L. H. Walker, Fifteenth Infantry, U. S. Army, in compliance with Special Orders No. 100, Series of 1875, Headquarters District of New Mexico; thence east along said thirty-third degree of north latitude to its intersection with the range line between ranges 16 and 17 east; thence north along said range line to place of beginning.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


Gila Reserve.
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
Office of Indian Affairs, May 14, 1860.

SIR:     This office having signified to Agent Steck its approbation of the establishment of a reservation in New Mexico for the Gila Apaches, including the Miembres, Mogolton, and Chilicayia bands of that tribe, he suggests the following boundaries for the same, viz: “Commencing at Santa Lucia Springs and running north 15 miles; thence west 15 miles; thence south 15 miles; thence east 15 miles to the place of beginning.

Agent Steck has been directed to have the boundaries of the reserve, as indicated by him, run out and marked, and to give notice thereof to the surveyor-general of New Mexico.

I have, therefore, to request that you will give instructions to that officer to respect the said reserve when in the progress of the public surveys he comes to connect them with the external boundaries of said reserve.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
A. B. GREENWOOD, Commissioner.

Hon. JOSEPH S. WILSON,
      Commissioner General Land Office.

(Occupied for a short time only and then abandoned. See Land Office Report for 1872, page 128.)


Hot Springs Reserve.
EXECUTIVE MANSION, April 9, 1874.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and reserved for the use and occupation of such Indians as the Secretary of the Interior may see fit to locate thereon, as indicated in this diagram, viz:

Beginning at the ruins of an ancient pueblo in the valley of the Cañada Alamosa River, about 7 miles above the present town of Cañada Alamosa, and running thence due east 10 miles; thence due north 25 miles; thence due west 30 miles; thence due south 25 miles; thence due east 20 miles to the place of beginning.

U. S. GRANT.


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EXECUTIVE MANSION, December 21, 1875.

It is hereby ordered that the tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico, lying within the following-described boundaries, viz:

Beginning at a point on the east side of the Cañada about 1,000 yards directly east of the ruins of an ancient pueblo in the valley of Cañada Alamosa River—about 7 miles above the town of Cañada Alamosa, and running thence due north 20 miles to a point; thence due west 20 miles to a point; thence due south 35 miles to a point; thence due east 20 miles to a point due south of the place of beginning; thence due north to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and set apart for the use and occupancy of the Southern Apache and such other Indians as it may be determined to place thereon, to be known as the “Hot Springs Indian Reservation;” and all that portion of country set apart by Executive order of April 9, 1874, not embraced within the limits of the above-described tract of country, is hereby restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, August 25, 1877.

It is hereby ordered that the order of December 21, 1875, setting apart the following lands in New Mexico as the Hot Springs Indian Reservation, viz: Beginning at a point on the east side of the Cañada, about 1,000 yards directly east of the ruins of an ancient pueblo in the valley of Cañada Alamosa River, about 7 miles above the town of Cañada Alamosa, and running thence due north 20 miles to a point; thence due west 20 miles to a point; thence due south 35 miles to a point; thence due east 20 miles to a point due south of the place of beginning; thence due north to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, canceled, and said lands are restored to the public domain.

R. B. HAYES.


Jicarilla Apache Reserve.
[Pueblo Agency; area, 447 ½ square miles.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 25, 1874.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico, set apart as a reservation for the Jicarilla Apache Indians by the first article of an agreement concluded with the said Indians December 10, 1873, subject to the action of Congress, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement, viz: Commencing at a point where the headwaters of the San Juan River crosses the southern boundary of the Territory of Colorado, following the course of said river until it intersects the eastern boundary of the Navajo Reservation; thence due north along said eastern boundary of the Navajo Reservation to where it intersects the southern boundary line of the Territory of Colorado; thence due east along the said southern boundary of the Territory of Colorado to the place of beginning.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, July 18, 1876.

It is hereby ordered that the order of March 25, 1874, setting apart the following-described lands in the Territory of New Mexico as a reservation for the Jicarilla Apache Indians, viz: “Commencing at a point where the headwaters of San Juan River crosses the southern

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boundary of the Territory of Colorado, following the course of said river until it intersects the eastern boundary of the Navajo Reservation; thence due north along said eastern boundary of the Navajo Reservation to where it intersects the southern boundary line of the Territory of Colorado; thence due east along the said southern boundary of the Territory of Colorado, to the place of beginning,” be, and the same is hereby, canceled, and said lands are restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, September 21, 1880.

It is hereby ordered that the tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico, lying within the following-described boundaries, viz: Beginning at the southwest corner of the Mexican grant known as the “Tierra Amarilla grant,” as surveyed by Sawyer and McBroom in July, 1876; and extending thence north with the western boundary of said survey of the Tierra Amarilla grant to the boundary line between New Mexico and Colorado; thence west along said boundary line 16 miles; thence south to a point due west from the aforesaid southwest corner of the Tierra Amarilla grant; and thence east to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, withheld from entry and settlement as public lands, and that the same be set apart as a reservation for the Jicarilla Apache Indians.

R. B. HAYES.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 15, 1884.

It is hereby ordered that the tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico set apart as a reservation for the Jicarilla Apache Indians by Executive order dated September 21, 1880, be, and the same hereby is, restored to the public domain.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, February 11, 1887.

It is hereby ordered that all that portion of the public domain in the Territory of New Mexico which, when surveyed, will be embraced in the following townships, viz:

27, 28, 29, and 30 north, ranges 1 east, and 1, 2, and 3 west; 31 and 32 north, ranges 2 west and 3 west, and the south half of township 31 north, range 1 west, be, and the same is hereby, set apart as a reservation for the use and occupation of the Jicarilla Apache Indians: Provided, That this order shall not be so construed as to deprive any bona fide settler of any valid rights he may have acquired under the law of the United States providing for the disposition of the public domain.

GROVER CLEVELAND.


Navaho Reserve.
EXECUTIVE MANSION, October 29, 1878.

It is hereby ordered that the tract of country in the Territory of Arizona lying within the following-described boundaries, viz: Commencing at the northwest corner of the Navajo Indian Reservation, on the boundary line between the Territories of Arizona and Utah; thence west along said boundary line to the one hundred and tenth

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degree of longitude west; thence south along said degree to the thirty-sixth parallel of latitude north; thence east along said parallel to the west boundary of the Navajo Reservation; thence north along said west boundary to the place of beginning, be, and the same hereby is, withdrawn from sale and settlement and set apart as an addition to the present reservation for the Navajo Indians.

R. B. HAYES.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, January 6, 1880.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described country lying within the boundaries of the Territories of New Mexico and Arizona, viz: Commencing in the middle of the channel of the San Juan River, where the east line of the Navajo Reservation in the Territory of New Mexico, as established by the treaty of June 1, 1868 (15 Stat., 667), crosses said river; thence up and along the middle channel of said river to a point 15 miles due east of the eastern boundary line of said reservation; thence due south to a point due east of the present southeast corner of said reservation; thence due south 6 miles; thence due west to the one hundred and tenth degree of west longitude; thence north along said degree to the southwest corner of said reservation in the Territory of Arizona, as defined by Executive order dated October 29, 1878, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement and set apart as an addition to the present Navajo Reservation in said Territories.

R. B. HAYES.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, Washington, May 17, 1884.

It is hereby ordered that the Executive order dated January 6, 1880, adding certain lands to the Navajo Reservation, in New Mexico and Arizona Territory, be, and the same is hereby, amended so as to exempt from its operation and exclude from said reservation all those portions of townships 29 north, ranges 14, 15, and 16 west of the New Mexico principal meridian, south of the San Juan River, in the Territory of New Mexico.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, Washington, D. C., May 17, 1884.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described lands in the Territories of Arizona and Utah be, and the same are, withheld from sale and settlement and set apart as a reservation for Indian purposes, viz:

Beginning on the one hundred and tenth degree of west longitude at 36 degrees and 30 minutes north latitude (the same being the northeast corner of the Moqui Indian Reservation); thence due west to the one hundred and eleventh degree thirty minutes west longitude; thence due north to the middle of the channel of the Colorado River; thence up and along the middle of the channel of said river to its intersection with the San Juan River, thence up and along the middle channel of San Juan River to west boundary of Colorado (32 degrees west longitude, Washington meridian); thence due south to the thirty-seventh parallel north latitude; thence west along said parallel to the one hundred and tenth degree of west longitude; thence due south to place of beginning: Provided, That any tract or tracts within the region of country described as aforesaid which are settled upon or occupied, or to which valid rights have attached under existing laws of the United States prior to date of this order, are hereby excluded from this reservation.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


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EXECUTIVE MANSION, April 24, 1886.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico, viz, all those portions of townships 29 north, ranges 14, 15, and 16 west of the New Mexico principal meridian, south of the San Juan River, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement and set apart as an addition to the Navajo Indian Reservation.

GROVER CLEVELAND.


EXECUTIVE MANSION,
Washington, D. C., November 19, 1892.

It is hereby ordered that the Executive order of May 17, 1884, by President Chester A. Arthur, withdrawing from sale and settlement and setting apart as a reservation for Indian purposes certain lands in the Territories of Utah and Arizona, be, and the same hereby is, modified so that all the lands described in said order which lie west of the 110th degree of west longitude and within the Territory of Utah be, and the same hereby are, restored to the public domain, freed from the reservation made by said order.

BENJ. HARRISON.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, January 8, 1900.

It is hereby ordered that the tract of country lying west of the Navajo and Moqui reservations in the Territory of Arizona, embraced within the following-described boundaries, viz, beginning at the southeast corner of the Moqui Reservation and running due west to the Little Colorado River; thence down that stream to the Grand Canyon Forest Reserve; thence north on the line of that reserve to the northeast corner thereof; thence west to the Colorado River; thence up that stream to the Navajo Indian Reservation, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement until further ordered.

WILLIAM MCKINLEY.


WHITE HOUSE, November 14, 1901.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country in Arizona, viz, commencing at a point where the south line of the Navajo Indian Reservation (addition of January 8, 1900) intersects the Little Colorado River; thence due south to the fifth standard parallel north; thence east on said standard to the middle of the south line of township 21 north, range 15 east; thence north on the line bisecting townships 21, 22, 23, 24, said range 15 east, to the south line of the Moqui Reservation; thence due west to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement until such time as the Indians residing thereon shall have been settled permanently under the provisions of the homestead laws or the general allotment act approved February 8, 1887 (24 Stats., 388), and the act amendatory thereof, approved February 28, 1891 (26 Stats., 794).

THEODORE ROOSEVELT.


Pueblo Industrial School Reserve.
EXECUTIVE MANSION, October 3, 1884.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of land in the county of Bernalillo and Territory of New Mexico, viz, all that certain piece, parcel, or tract of land situate, lying, and being in the

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county of Bernalillo and Territory of New Mexico, bounded on the north by lands of J. K. Basye, on the east by lands of Diego Garcia and Miguel Antonio Martin and others, on the south by lands of the Jesuit fathers, and on the west by lands of the Jesuit fathers, said tract being more particularly bounded and described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a stake at the northwest corner of the lands formerly owned by John H. McMinn and running thence north 4 degrees and 53 minutes west, 731.7 feet, to a stake at the northwest corner of the land hereby conveyed; thence north 84 degrees and 52 minutes east, 2,320.7 feet to a stake at the northeast corner of the land hereby conveyed; thence south 3 degrees and 45 minutes east, 720.4 feet, to a stake; thence south 7 degrees and 30 minutes west, 793 feet, to a stake at the southeast corner of the land hereby conveyed; thence north 85 degrees and 50 minutes west, 184.6 feet, to a stake; thence north 87 degrees and 42 minutes west, 615 feet, to a stake; thence north 81 degrees and 52 minutes west, 203 feet, to a stake; thence north 78 degrees and 44 minutes west, 224 feet, to a stake; thence north 73 degrees and 19 minutes west, 176.4 feet, to a stake; thence north 70 degrees and 14 minutes west, 234 feet, to a stake; thence north 78 degrees and 38 minutes west, 567.7 feet, to a stake at the southwest corner of the land hereby conveyed; and thence north 6 degrees and 8 minutes west, 234.4 feet, to the point and place of beginning, containing 65.79 acres, more or less; which said tract of land was conveyed to the United States of America by a certain deed of conveyance bearing date the 7th day of June, A. D. 1882, from Elias S. Clark, of the town of Albuquerque, in the county and Territory aforesaid, as a site for an industrial school for Pueblo and other Indians, and the erection thereon of suitable buildings and other improvements for such purposes, be, and the same hereby is, reserved and set apart for Indian purposes.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


Pueblo of San Felipe Reserve.
WHITE HOUSE, June 13, 1902.

It is hereby ordered that all that portion of the public domain in the Territory of New Mexico which when surveyed will embraced the following sections, viz, sections 1, 2, 3, 10, 11, and 12, in township 13 north, range 5 east, New Mexico principal meridian, so far as said sections lie north of the town of Tejon patented lands and a line due west from the northwest corner of the Tejon grant and without the land patented to the Pueblo of San Felipe by act of Congress; also fractional sections 1, 2, and 3, and sections 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 34, 35, and 36, in township 14 north, range 5 east, so far as the same lie outside of the lands patented to the Pueblos of San Felipe and Santo Domingo by act of Congress, be, and the same is hereby, set apart as a reservation for the use and occupation of the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico belonging to the Pueblo of San Felipe: Provided, however, That any tract or tracts to which valid existing rights have attached, under the laws of the United States providing for the disposition of the public domain, are hereby excepted and excluded from the reservation hereby created: And provided further, That if at any time the lands covered by any valid claim shall be relinquished to the United States or the claim lapse, or the entry be canceled for any cause whatever, such lands shall be added to and become a part of the reservation for the Pueblo of San Felipe, as herein provided for.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT.


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Tulerosa Valley Reserve.
CAMP TULEROSA, N. MEX., August 29, 1871.

NATHANIEL POPE, Esq.,
      Superintendent of Indian Affairs:

SIR:     Agreeably to the power conferred upon me by the President, and communicated to me in the letter of the honorable Secretary of the Interior of the 22d July, 1871, that I should proceed to New Mexico and Arizona and there take such action as in my judgment should be deemed wisest and most proper for locating the nomadic tribes of those Territories upon suitable reservations, bringing them under the control of the proper officers of the Indian Department, etc., assisted by yourself and O. F. Piper, agent for the Southern Apache Indians, I have carefully examined the place and neighborhood at Canada Alamosa, where the agency is at present located, and for several reasons find the same unsuitable for a reservation. Assisted by the officers named above, I have also carefully inspected the valley of the Tulerosa, and finding the same to possess most of the requisites necessary to a home for the Indians, it being remote from white settlements, surrounded by mountains, and easily crossed, with sufficient arable lands, good water, and plenty of wood and game, I hereby declare the said valley of the Tulerosa, beginning at the headwaters of the Tulerosa River and its tributaries in the mountains, and extending down the same 2 miles on each side for a distance of 30 miles, to be an Indian reservation for the sole use and occupation of the Southern and other roving bands of Apache Indians, their agent, and other officers and employés of the Government, the laws relating to Indian reservations in the United States governing the same until such time as the Executive or Congress shall set aside this order. I would therefore suggest that Agent Piper be instructed to remove his agency and the Indians under his charge from Canada Alamosa to the Tulerosa Valley as soon as practicable after the receipt of this letter. The War Department having directed the officers commanding the district of New Mexico and Arizona to afford military protection to such Indians as may be induced to come in, both on their way and after arrival at the reservation, the agency will be amply protected, and the Department having authorized me to supply these Indians with whatever may be necessary, you are at liberty to incur such moderate expenditures as may be absolutely necessary to carry out the above instructions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
VINCENT COLYER, Commissioner.

(For other correspondence relating to this reserve and Executive order of November 9, 1871, see “White Mountain Reserve, Arizona, ante, page 810.”)


EXECUTIVE MANSION, November 24, 1874.

All orders establishing and setting apart the Tulerosa Valley, in New Mexico—described as follows: Beginning at the headwaters of the Tulerosa River and its tributaries in the mountains, and extending down the same 10 miles on each side for a distance of 30 miles—as an Indian reservation, are hereby revoked and annulled; and the said described tract of country is hereby restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.


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Zuñi Pueblo Reserve.
EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 16, 1877.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico, viz: Beginning at the one hundred and thirty-sixth mile-stone, on the western boundary line of the Territory of New Mexico, and running thence north 61 degrees 45 minutes east, 31.8 miles to the crest of the mountain a short distance above Nutria Springs; thence due south 12 miles to point in the hills a short distance southeast of the Ojo Pescado; thence south 61 degrees 45 minutes west to the one hundred and forty-eighth mile-stone on the western boundary line of said Territory; thence north with said boundary line to the place of beginning, be, and the same hereby is, withdrawn from sale and set apart as a reservation for the use and occupancy of the Zuñi Pueblo Indians.

R. B. HAYES.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 1, 1883.

Whereas it is found that certain descriptions as to boundaries given in an Executive order issued March 16, 1877, setting apart a reservation in the Territory of New Mexico for the Zuñi Pueblo Indians, are not stated with sufficient definiteness to include within said reservation all the lands specified in and intended to be covered by said Executive order, especially the Nutria Springs and the Ojo Pescado, said Executive order is hereby so amended that the description of the tract of land thereby set apart for the purposes therein named shall read as follows:

Beginning at the one hundred and thirty-sixth mile-post on the west boundary line of the Territory of New Mexico; thence in a direct line to the southwest corner of township 11 north, range 18 west; thence east and north, following section lines, so as to include sections 1, 12, 13, 14, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 32, 33, 34, 35, and 36, in said township; thence from the northeast corner of said township, on the range line between ranges 17 and 18 west, to the third correction line north; thence east on said correction line to the nearest section line in range 16, from whence a line due south would include the Zuñi settlements in the region of Nutria and Nutria Springs and the Pescado Springs; thence south following section lines to the township line between townships 9 and 10 north, range 16 west; thence west on said township line to the range line between ranges 16 and 17 west; thence in a direct line to the one hundred and forty-eighth mile-post on the western boundary line of said Territory; thence north along said boundary line to place of beginning.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 3, 1885.

It is hereby ordered that the Executive order dated May 1, 1883, explaining, defining, and extending the boundaries of the Zuñi Indian Reservation, in the Territory of New Mexico, be, and the same is hereby, amended so as to except and exclude from the addition made to said reservation by the said Executive order of May 1, 1883, any and all lands which were at the date of said order settled upon and occupied in good faith under the public-land laws of the United States.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


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