INDIAN AFFAIRS: LAWS AND TREATIES

Vol. I, Laws     (Compiled to December 1, 1902)

Compiled and edited by Charles J. Kappler. Washington : Government Printing Office, 1904.


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APPENDIX II.


Miscellaneous letters and documents pertaining to Executive orders establishing Indian reserves.


{Page 1047}

INDIAN TERRITORY—FORT SUPPLY MILITARY RESERVE.

[See ante, page 843.]

WAR DEPARTMENT,
Washington City, April 17, 1882.

SIR: I have the honor, upon recommendation of the commanding general, Department of the Missouri, concurred in by the Lieutenant-General and the General of the Army, to request that a military reservation may be duly declared and set apart by the Executive for the post of Fort Supply, Indian Territory, and with the assent of the Interior Department, that it embrace the following described tract of land, viz:

Township 24 north, range 22 west, in the Indian Territory. Area, 36 square miles, or 23,040 acres.

I have the honor to be, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant,

ROBERT T. LINCOLN, Secretary of War.

The PRESIDENT.

[Indorsement.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION,
Washington, April 18, 1882.

The within request is approved and the reservation is made and proclaimed accordingly.

The Secretary of the Interior will cause the same to be noted in the General Land Office.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


MICHIGAN—OTTAWA AND CHIPPEWA RESERVE.

[See ante, page 849.]

GENERAL LAND OFFICE, August 8, 1855.

SIR: I have the honor to return herewith the letter of the Acting Commissioner of Indian Affairs and its inclosure of the 4th instant, referred by the acting chief clerk of the Department to this office, same day, for report, requesting the withdrawal from sale of certain lands therein described, in the State of Michigan, in order that selections may be made therefrom for the Ottawas and Chippewas of Michigan, under a treaty concluded on the 31st July, 1855.

In reply, I herewith inclose a printed diagram, showing by the red shades the relative positions (as near as can be shown on a small scale) of the tracts requested to be reserved, and have to state that portions of the lands, it appears from an examination of the tract books, have been sold to individuals and selected by the State for swamp lands, and that the small tracts reserved for light-house purposes are embraced thereby. With these exceptions there appears to be no objection to withdrawing the lands temporarily until the contemplated selections are made.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. HOOD, Acting Commissioner.

Hon. ROBT. MCCLELLAND,
Secretary of Interior.


DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
Washington, August 8, 1855.

SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith for your approval the application from the Indian Office of the 4th instant, for the withdrawal from sale certain tracts of land in the State of Michigan for the purpose of making selections therefrom for the Ottawas and Chippewas of Michigan under a treaty concluded the 31st ultimo.

The matter having been submitted to the General Land Office with a view of ascertaining whether any objection was known there to the proposed withdrawal, the Acting Commissioner replies on this day that no objection was known, with certain exceptions to special tracts previously appropriated.

It is therefore recommended that, with the exception mentioned, the lands referred to be temporarily withdrawn from sale for the purposes desired.

With much respect, your obedient servant,

R. MCCLELLAND, Secretary.

The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

{Page 1048}

MINNESOTA—FOND DU LAC RESERVE.

[See ante, p. 851.]

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,
November 16, 1858.

SIR: I have received a letter from the Commissioner of the General Land Office of the 10th instant, inclosing a copy of the plat and field notes of the survey of the exterior boundary of the Fond du Lac Reservation, made in conformity with the provisions of the fourth clause of the second article of the Chippewa treaty of September 30, 1854, together with a copy of a communication from Peter E. Bradshaw, deputy surveyor, addressed to the surveyor-general of Minnesota.

Mr. Bradshaw represents that the boundary of said reserve does not include the principal settlement of the Indians, which with their improvements are located at “Perch Lake” and its vicinity, which lake is some 3 or 4 miles south of the southern boundary of the reservation as established by said survey.

The deputy surveyor states that the Indians are very much dissatisfied with the location of said boundary line, and they claim that the treaty secured to them Perch Lake.

I am fully satisfied that it was the understanding of the respective parties who negotiated the treaty that the southern boundary line, as therein described, should have embraced the Indian settlements at Perch Lake, and in consideration of the fact that an error has occurred in the description of the line in question, which, if not corrected, would compel the Indians to abandon the only settlement, perhaps, where they can acquire a subsistence, I would respectfully recommend that, with your concurrence, the subject be laid before the President, with a view to such action as may be necessary to withdraw from preemption and sale so much of the public lands in the vicinity of Perch Lake as may be required to protect the interests of the Indians and secure to them their improved settlements in order that appropriate steps may be taken with the approbation of the Executive to settle existing difficulties pertaining to said boundary by subsequent negotiations looking to a change of the lines of the present reserve.

The estimated area of the reservation embraces 125,294 acres, being about 25,000 acres more than was contemplated by the stipulations of the treaty, and therefore I would suggest that the Government as well as the Indians would be benefited by extending the southern boundary so as to include the Indian settlements, and by reducing the aggregate area in order that the reserve may embrace as nearly as possible 100,000 acres.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. DENVER, Commissioner.

Hon. J. THOMPSON, Secretary of the Interior.

WASHINGTON—COLUMBIA RESERVE.

[See Ante, p. 904.]

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,
Washington, D. C., January 25, 1894.

Sir: On August 1, 1893, I received, by reference from the General Land Office, a letter dated July 17, 1893, from the register of the local land office at Waterville, Wash., stating that an Indian named Alfred appeared at his office on the date of the said letter with copy of an allotment, numbered 20, in the name of Charles Iswald, an Indian, for lands near the Methow River in Okanogan County, said State; that Indian Alfred stated that Iswald had gone to the Colville Indian Reservation in Washington, abandoning his wife and three children, and had not returned, having been absent for the period of six months; that his wife desired to hold the land embraced within the said allotment, and asked to know if she could do so; that said Iswald remarried after going to the Colville Reservation.

The register adds in his said letter that some action should be taken in the premises to protect the interests of the abandoned wife and her children.

In connection with this matter I have the honor to state that on November 25, 1893, I directed Capt. J. W. Bubb, U. S. A., acting Indian agent of the Colville Agency, said State, to ascertain whether the said Indian Iswald had removed to his reservation and married a second time, and, if there, whether he intended to remain upon the reservation or return to his allotment referred to and care for his first wife and children.

The opinion was expressed in said office letter that it would be well for the agent to correspond with Mrs. Charles Iswald, then in occupancy of the said allotment, and ascertain from her all the facts in her possession in relation to the allotment, its abandonment by the allottee, and her desire to remain thereon and cultivate the same for the use and benefit of herself and children.

The agent was advised that the allotment referred to contained 640 acres and was made to Charles Iswald under the provisions of the Moses agreement, entered into July 7, 1883, and ratified by act of Congress approved July 4, 1884 (23 Stats., 79 and 80), and that the same, with other allotments surveyed for and made to Sar sarp kin and other Indians, was approved by the Acting Secretary of the Interior April 12, 1886.

It was suggested that if the said Charles Iswald intended to remain upon the Colville Reservation and make it his home in the future he should relinquish to the United States his allotment under the said agreement, and the agent was instructed, in the event that the said Indian had so determined, to obtain from him his voluntary relinquishment of his said allotment in order that steps might be taken to allot the lands embraced therein to his wife and children.

The agent was further instructed to make a full report of his action in this matter and forward to this office for its consideration the relinquishment of the allotment mentioned should the Indian execute same.

{Page 1049}

I am now in receipt of a communication dated January 7, 1894, from the said acting Indian agent, stating that he recently visited the vicinity of Lake Chelan, Washington, and made an effort to see Mrs. Charles Iswald, but that for some reason she failed to be at the place appointed for the meeting (Antoine’s house); that he had previously informed her that he desired to confer with her about her husband’s claim to the allotment above referred to; that she sent him word by Antoine, a relative, that she would be glad to have the claim for herself and child (only one child now living); that she had not lived on the land for some time and that there were no improvements of any kind on the same.

The said agent further states that he experienced considerable difficulty in finding Charles Iswald under that name; that he claims his correct name is Kis wal a kin; that at Lake Chelan, among Wapato John’s people, Iswald is known by the name of Il le acke; that he judges that name would be the best to give his wife in assigning her the allotment, her church name being Rose Marie; that Charles Iswald, now known as Kis wal a kin, lives at present on the Colville Indian Reservation, near Moses Crossing of the Columbia River, with another woman, by whom he has three children; that he states that he does not want his allotment on the old Columbia Reservation, above referred to, and has no intention of ever going back there to live with his former wife, for reasons which the Indian deemed satisfactory to himself.

The agent inclosed the relinquishment of the said Charles Iswald of his allotment, No. 20, containing 640 acres, on the Columbia River, in the vicinity of Lake Chelan, State of Washington, granted to him under the provisions of the Moses treaty and act of Congress above referred to, executing same on January 2, 1894, in the presence of John W. Bubb, acting Indian agent of the Colville Agency, and C. R. Bubb, and transferring thereby to the United States all his right, title, and interest in and to the lands embraced therein.

There is given on the sheet embracing the relinquishment a certificate executed by Robert Flett, interpreter, dated January 2, 1894, to the effect that he was present and witnessed the signing of the relinquishment by the said Charles Iswald, and that he clearly explained its nature to him, and is satisfied that he fully understood the same.

The said Moses agreement entered into July 7, 1883, copy of which may be found by reference to page 70 of the Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for the year ending 1883, provided that all Indians belonging to the band of Chief Moses then living on the Columbia Reservation, in the State of Washington, not removing to the Colville Reservation within two years from the date of said agreement, should be entitled to 640 acres, or I square mile, of land to each head of a family or male adult, in the possession and ownership of which they should be guaranteed and protected.

On May 1, 1886, the President issued an Executive order, which may be found on page 75 of Executive Orders relating to Indian Reserves, issued prior to April 1, 1890 (copy herewith), to the effect that the tracts of land in then Washington Territory (now State) surveyed for and allotted to Sar sarp kin and other Indians, in accordance with the provisions of the said act of July 4, 1884 (23 Stats., pp. 79 and 80), which allotments were approved by the Acting Secretary of the Interior April 12, 1886, be set apart for the exclusive use and occupation of said Indians.

The allotment referred to and relinquished by the said Charles Iswald is No. 20, which may also be found on page 79 of said Executive Order pamphlet.

The right and title which the said Indian allottee had in the lands described in said allotment No. 20 was that of possession, use, and occupation; and as he has relinquished whatever right and title he had in and to the land referred to, it would seem that the entire title thereto is vested now in the United States; and as he has abandoned his first wife and ceased to provide for her comfort and welfare, and as she desires to retain possession of and use and occupy the said allotment, it would seem that the same should be reserved to her and her child for that purpose.

As the lands embraced within said allotment are reserved by Executive order of date May 1, 1886, above mentioned, it would appear that proper action in the case would be to present the matter to the President for his approval of the reservation for the purpose indicated. This matter, however, is submitted to you for your determination.

I have prepared and inclose herewith a draft of an order reserving the lands referred to for the purpose indicated, which, if you deem Executive action necessary, may be forwarded to the President for his approval.

The papers in the case and copy of this report are herewith inclosed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. M. BROWNING, Commissioner.

The SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

[Inclosure.]

I, Charles Iswald (correct name Kis-wal-a-kin), do hereby relinquish to the United States all my right, title, and interest in and to the land contained under allotment No. 20 (containing 640 acres), on the Columbia River, in the vicinity of Lake Chelan, in the State of Washington, granted to me under the provisions of the “Moses Treaty,” entered into July 7, 1883, and ratified by act of Congress approved July 4, 1884.

Done at Colville Indian Agency, Wash., this 2d day of January, A. D. 1894.

CHARLES ISWALD (his x mark).

In the presence of—
JNO. W. BUBB, Captain, U. S. A., Agent.
C. R. BUBB.

I, Robert Flett, interpreter, hereby certify on honor that I was present and witnessed the signing of this instrument by the said Charles Iswald; that I fully explained its nature, and am satisfied he fully understands the same.

ROBERT FLETT, Interpreter.

COLVILLE AGENCY, WASH., January 2, 1894.

{Page 1050}

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
Washington, February 19, 1894.

The PRESIDENT:

By Executive order of May 1, 1886, the following lands in the Moses Reservation, Washington Territory, were set apart for the exclusive use and occupation of Charles Iswald, a member of said tribe:

“This claim lies about 2 miles in a northeasterly direction from Antoine’s claim. It contains no timber, but is mostly fair grazing land, with about 100 acres susceptible of cultivation. No improvements. From pine tree on right bank of Columbia River, blazed on four sides, where rocky spur 200 feet high comes down to near bank, forming narrow pass, from which a blazed pine 36 inches in diameter bears north 177 links distant, run south 13 degrees west (variation 22 degrees east).

“102.25 chains, made stone monument for corner on hillside in view of main trail. Thence run south 5 ¾ degrees west.

“78.00 chains, made stone monument for corner. Thence south ¼ degree west.

“25.65 chains, made stone monument on bank of Columbia River for corner. Thence with said river to a point of beginning, containing 640 acres of land.”

The accompanying letter from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, dated 25th ultimo, and its inclosures, show that Charles Iswald (Kis wal a kin) abandoned his wife and child some six years ago and moved to the Colville Reservation, Washington, and is now living there with another woman, by whom he has three children, and that, on January 2, 1894, he relinquished his said allotment to the United States.

The wife has made application to the register of the land office at Waterville, Wash., to have the lands in question reserved for her and her child, and the Commissioner is of the opinion that the same should be so reserved.

I have therefore the honor to recommend that the lands set apart by Executive order of May 1, 1886, for the exclusive use and occupation of Charles Iswald, and by him relinquished to the United States, be reserved for the exclusive use and occupation of Mrs. Charles Iswald, or Rose Marie, and her child, and that said authority be indorsed hereon.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HOKE SMITH, Secretary.

[Indorsement.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 9, 1894.

Approved:

GROVER CLEVELAND.


Whereas the records show that on the 28th day of November, 1890, Chelan Bob (an Indian) filed in the local land office at Waterville, Wash., his application for the NW. ¼, the N. ½ of the SW. ¼, and lots 1, 2, and 3 of sec. 20, T. 27 N., R. 23 E., Willamette meridian, containing 337.60 acres;

That on December 1, 1890, Cultus Jim (an Indian) filed in said local land office his application for the SE. ¼ of the SE. ¼ of sec. 19, the S. ½ of the SW. ¼, and lot 4 of sec. 20 and lots 2 and 3 of sec. 29 of the said township and range, containing 209.40 acres;

That on December 1, 1890, Long Jim (an Indian) filed in said local land office his application for the NE. ¼ of the NE. ¼ of the SE. ¼ and lot 1 of sec. 11, the W. ½ of sec. 12, lot 1 of sec. 14, and lots 1 and 2 of sec. 13, T. 27 N., R. 22 E., Willamette meridian, containing 525.30 acres, under the agreement entered into July 7, 1883, between the Secretary of the Interior and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and Chief Moses and other Indians of the Columbia and Colville reservations, in then Washington Territory, now State, ratified and confirmed by act of Congress approved July 4, 1884 (23 Stats., pp. 79, 80); and

Whereas all of the land filed for by Chelan Bob, all filed for by Cultus Jim except 40 acres, and all filed for by Long Jim except 80 acres was claimed adversely to said Indians by white settlers, as follows:

A. W. La Chapelle, C. H. Abercrombie, Charles A. Barron, Enos B. Peaslee, Harrison Williams, Thomas R. Gibson, Julius Larabee, and Christopher Robinson, who respectively made separate entries of certain tracts of land; and

Whereas the Commissioner of the General Land Office, on July 9, 1892, decided that said Indian applicants are entitled to have allotments of the lands made to them in severalty in the quantities and manner provided in the said agreement of July 7, 1883, and that the right of several white claimants above named to the lands claimed by them is subordinate and subject to the prior and superior right of said Indians, denying the application of said Robinson, holding for cancellation the filling of said Larabee, and suspending and holding for cancellation the entries of said La Chapelle, Abercrombie, Barron, Peaslee, and Williams in so far as they might include any tract of land which might be allotted by the proper authorities to said Indians, and suspending the entry of said Gibson to await such action as might be deemed just and proper in the premises; and

Whereas the Secretary of the Interior, on January 6, 1893, affirmed the said decision of the Commissioner of the General Land Office, appeal having been taken to him by the said white entrymen from the decision of that office; and

Whereas the Secretary of the Interior, on September 23, 1893, denied the motion of said white entrymen for a rehearing in the case; and

Whereas the Commissioner of the General Land Office, on March 20, 1894, canceled on that day on the records of that office the entries made by said white entrymen as follows:

No. 1157, by A. W. Chapelle, for the NE. ¼ SW. ¼ and lots 3 and 4, sec. 20, lots 2 and 3, sec. 29, T. 27 N., R. 23 E., made March 15, 1889.

No. 1163, by C. H. Abercrombie, for E. ½ NW. ¼ and lots 1 and 2, sec. 20, T. 27 N., R. 23 E., made March 15, 1889.

{Page 1051}

No. 1513, by Charles A. Barron, for NW. ¼ NW. ¼ sec. 20, SW. ¼ SW. ¼ sec. 17, and S. ½ SE. ¼ sec. 18, T. 27 N., R. 23 E., made July 5, 1890.

No. 1526, by Enos B. Peaslee, for lot 1, NE. ¼ SE. ¼, and S. ½ NE. ¼ sec. 11, T. 27 N., R. 22 E., made July 14, 1890.

No. 1528, by Harrison Williams, for E. ½ SE. ¼ sec. 19 and W. ½ SW. ¼ sec. 20, T. 27 N., R. 23 E., made July 16, 1890.

No. 1586, by Thomas R. Gibson, for E. ½ SW. ¼, NW. ¼, and SW. ¼ SE. ¼ sec. 12, T. 27 N., R. 22 E., made October 17, 1890.

Christopher Robinson (date and number not given) made homestead application for SW. ¼ SW. ¼ sec. 12, and lots 1, 2, and 3, sec. 13, T. 27 N., R. 22 E.

September 17, 1889, Julius Larabee filed D. S. No. 2326 for NW. ¼ NE. ¼, E. ½ NE. ¼ sec. 19, and SW. ¼ NW. ¼ sec. 20, T. 27 N., R. 23 E., all in the State of Washington, and notified the register and receiver of the Waterville local land office, said State, to make proper annotations on their records:

Now, therefore, I, Hoke Smith, Secretary of the Interior, in accordance with the provisions of the said agreement, ratified and confirmed by the said act of Congress, and under the said decision of the General Land Office, affirmed by the Department, do hereby set apart for the exclusive use and occupation of said Indians the following-described lands, namely:

For Chelan Bob the NW. ¼, N. ½ SW ¼, and lots 1, 2, and 3 of sec. 20, T. 27 N., R. 23 E., Willamette meridian, containing 337.60 acres;

For Cultus Jim the SE ¼ SE. ¼ of sec. 19, the S. ½ SW. ¼ and lot 4 of sec. 20, and lots 2 and 3 of sec. 29 of the same township and range, containing 209.40 acres; and

For Long Jim the NE. ¼ NE. ¼ SE. ¼, and lot 1 of sec. 11, W. ½ sec. 12, lot 1, of sec. 14, and lots 1 and 2 of sec. 13, T. 27 N., R. 22 E., Willamette meridian, containing 525.30 acres; all in the State of Washington.

HOKE SMITH, Secretary.

April 11, 1894.


The departmental order of April 11, 1894, setting aside certain lands under the Moses agreement concluded July 7, 1883, ratified and confirmed by act of Congress approved July 4, 1884 (23 Stats., pp. 79-80), for the exclusive use and benefit respectively of the Indians therein named (Chelan Bob, Cultus Jim, and Long Jim), is hereby modified and changed so as to eliminate from the allotment made to Long Jim the following described lands: The E. ½ of the SW. ¼ and NW. ¼ of the SW. ¼ of sec. 12, T. 27 N., R. 22 E., Willamette meridian, Washington, the said lands being embraced in the entry of Thomas R. Gibson, No. 1586, which said entry remains intact upon the records of the General Land Office under Department decision of September 23, 1893, modifying Department decision of January 6, 1893, so as to omit from affirmance that part of the General Land Office decision dated July 9, 1892, wherein that office suspended the commuted entry of said Gibson, the allotment to said Indian, Long Jim, as corrected, embracing the following described lands: The NE. ¼ of the NE. ¼ of the SE. ¼ and lot 1 of sec. 11, the NW. ¼ and SW. ¼ of the SW. ¼ of sec. 12, lot 1 of sec. 14, and lots 1 and 2 of sec. 13, T. 27 N., R. 22 E., Willamette meridian, Washington.

HOKE SMITH, Secretary.

APRIL 20, 1894.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, January 19, 1895.

It is hereby ordered that the tract of land embraced in allotment No. 37, located in the State of Washington, made to an Indian named John Salla-Salla, by the Acting Secretary of the Interior, April 12, 1886, under the Moses agreement entered into July 7, 1883, ratified and confirmed by act of Congress approved July 4, 1884 (23 Stats., pp. 79, 80), lying within the following-described boundaries, viz:

“Commencing at the junction of Johnston Creek and the Okanagan (Okinakane) River; thence by Johnston Creek (variation 22º 15') south 69º 45' west 40 chains; built monument of stone on the south bank of Johnston Creek Station—; 8º 15' west 91.54 chains; built monument of basaltic stone, station—; north 69º 45' east 117.50 chains to the Okanagan (Okinakane) River; set balm stake 4 inches square, 4 feet long, marked Station 3, north 45º 30' west 86.53 chains to the place of beginning, the mouth of Johnston Creek. Area 630 acres,” and set apart by Executive order of May 1, 1886, for the exclusive use and occupation of said allottee, be, and the same is hereby, restored to the public domain, upon the cancellation of said allotment, which is hereby directed.

GROVER CLEVELAND.

WISCONSIN—LAC DU FLAMBEAU RESERVE.

[See ante, p. 931.]

OFFICE SUPERINTENDENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,
St. Paul, November 14, 1863.

SIR: I inclose herewith Agent L. E. Webb’s report from the surveyors of the Lac du Flambeau and Lac Courte Oreille reservations, together with maps, plats, and field notes of the same.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. G. WYKOFF, Clerk.

Hon. WM. P. DOLE,
Commissioner Indian Affairs, Washington, D. C.

{Page 1052}

[Inclosures.]

OFFICE OF THE LAKE SUPERIOR INDIAN AGENCY,
Bayfield, Wis., May 1, 1863.

SIR: I have to request that you proceed as soon as possible to Lac du Flambeau and make surveys of an Indian reservation, as per article 1 of treaty of September 30, 1854.

You will consult with the Indians and as far as practicable carry out their wishes in the selection of the land. I do not deem it necessary to do anything more than run the exterior lines, and you will mark them thoroughly, so that the Indians can understand the limits of the reservation.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. E. WEBB, Indian Agent.

A. C. STUNTZ, Esq.,
Surveyor, Bayfield, Wis.

We, the chiefs of Lac du Flambeaux bands of Chippewa Indians, in council assembled, hereby agree to concentrate our Indians to a reservation the boundaries whereof to be defined and marked by actual survey as pointed out to us this day by A. C. Stuntz, surveyor, through our interpreter, William W. Johnson, whenever the agent of Chippewa Indians of Lake Superior requires it.

We also petition said Indian agent, our father, and through him our Great Father, the President, that the above-named surveyor be allowed to select for us lands joining our reservation to make up the full amount covered by lakes that may come within the boundaries whenever subdivided so as to ascertain the same. We also ask that there may be added to our reservation certain sugar free lands to be selected so that each family living on the reservation can have their sugar works within the boundaries of the reservation which will not be embraced in the present reservation.

This to accompany the respects of the said surveyor.

Signed this 26th day of May, 1863.

AH MOOSE (his x mark).
ASH KAN BAH WISH (his x mark).
KE WISH TE NO (his x mark).
A. C. STUNTZ, Surveyor.

In the presence of—
WILLIAM W. JOHNSON.
WILLIAM BRADFORD.

[Notes of survey of Lac du Flambeau Indian Reservation, by A. C. Stuntz, in townships 40 and 41 north, ranges 4, 5, and 6 east of the fourth principal meridian in Wisconsin.]

Commencing at the corner to sections 13, 18, 19, and 24, township 40, between ranges 4 and 5; thence east to corner to sections 13, 18, 19, and 24, between ranges 5, and 6; thence south on range line between ranges 5 and 6 to corner to sections 1, 6, 7, and 12, ranges 5 and 6, township 39; thence east to corner to sections 4, 5, 8, and 9, range 6; thence north to corner to sections 4, 5, 32, and 33, townships 41 and 42 north, range 6 east; thence west on said township line to corner to sections 4, 5, 32, and 33, township 41 and 42, range 4 east; thence south to a point on fourth correction line 715 link west of corner to sections 32 and 33 (a corner of the reservation); thence east on said correction line to said corner to sections 32 and 33; thence continuing east to corner between sections 2, 3, 34, and 35, township 40 and 41, range 4 east; thence south to corner to sections 14, 15, 22, and 23, township 40 north, range 4 east (a corner of the reservation); thence east to place of beginning.


DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
Washington, D. C., June 26, 1866.

SIR: By the third section of the second article of the treaty, September 30, 1854, with the Chippewa Indians of Lake Superior and the Mississippi, provision is made for setting apart and withholding from sale “a tract of land lying about Lac de Flambeau” “equal in extent to three townships, the boundaries of which shall be hereafter agreed upon or fixed by the President.” (Stat. L., vol. 10, p. 1109.)

As the lands in the vicinity of this lake are about to be offered at public sale, you are instructed to withdraw and withhold from sale the lands described in the accompanying copy of a communication from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs of the 22d instant, until such time as the boundaries of the reservation contemplated by the treaty are fully defined.

In acknowledging the receipt of this letter you will report your action under these instructions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. T. OTTO, Acting Secretary.

Hon. J. M. EDMUNDS,
Commissioner of the General Land Office.


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