Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture

Skip Navigation

Electronic Publishing Center
Oklahoma Historical Society
Encyclopedia Homepage
Search all Volumes
Disclaimer and Usage
© Copyright 2003

Table of Contents Search All Entries Home

SEVEN BC (7BC) RANCH

Known for his race- and polo horses, Charles Bryant Campbell (1861-1925), a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation, used the 7BC brand for his ranch in Minco. In 1880 Montford Johnson, Campbell's uncle, gave Campbell and his sister Ella each one hundred head of cattle and a ranch at Council Grove, within the present Oklahoma City metropolitan area. After several incidents with Boomers, who clamored for the Unassigned Lands, Johnson moved Campbell to a ranch near present Purcell, offering him twenty horses and a partnership in another cattle herd. In 1884 Campbell married Margaret Jane Williams, the daughter of "Caddo" Bill Williams, owner of the Half Moon Ranch, which specialized in breeding horses. By 1885 Campbell had established his own ranch west of Silver City, a town on the Chisholm Trail, where his mother and relatives resided.

In 1890 the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway built a depot on Campbell's property, around which the town of Minco was established. Most of the residents of Silver City moved to Minco where Campbell built a business block, donated to the El Meta Bond College, helped organize the bank, and opened a clothing store. In 1900 he was also a founder of the First National Bank of Chickasha.

Campbell and his relatives claimed much of present Grady County and portions of McClain County. His uncle Charley Campbell operated a large ranch near Chickasha, his stepfather James Bond ranched at Silver City, his father-in-law "Caddo" Williams ran the Half Moon Ranch near Verden, and Montford Johnson and his son E. B. Johnson had ranches around Silver City and near present Newcastle and Washington.

Around 1900 Campbell and E. B. Johnson purchased the Half Moon Ranch, buying all of the cattle and twelve of the horses. Before long Campbell's ranch was known for its race- and polo horses. He exported horses to England and other European countries, as well as New York City, Chicago, and St. Louis. His ranch introduced the game of polo to Oklahoma and Indian territories, with his cowboys often defeating better-dressed teams from the eastern United States. He raised Thoroughbred racehorses including Bowling Green, Mint, Black Toney, and Bear. His best remembered horse, U-See-It, which he sold for little money, foaled Black Gold for the Hoots Ranch, with Black Toney as the father. Black Gold won the 1924 Kentucky Derby.

Campbell eventually bought out E. B. Johnson and gained control of the Half Moon Ranch. In 1920 he built a large house in Chickasha and administered his ranching operations from that city. Around then he made ill-advised business deals with his cousin, Ben Johnson, and J. D. Suggs, losing most of his assets and ranch. Charles B. Campbell died on February 25, 1925, and is buried at Rose Hill Cemetery in Chickasha.

SEE ALSO: CATTLE INDUSTRY, CHICKASAW, RANCHING–AMERICAN INDIAN.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Chickasha (Oklahoma) Daily Express, 26 February 1925. Neil R. Johnson, The Chickasaw Rancher, ed. C. Neil Kingsley (Rev. ed.; Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 2001). Joseph B. Thoburn, A Standard History of Oklahoma (Chicago: American Historical Society, 1916). "Useeit and Her Little Black Colt," Daily Oklahoman (Oklahoma City), 5 May 1935.

Larry O'Dell

© Oklahoma Historical Society

Return to top


Electronic Publishing Center | OSU Home | Search this Site