INDIAN AFFAIRS: LAWS AND TREATIES

Vol. I, Laws     (Compiled to December 1, 1902)

Compiled and edited by Charles J. Kappler. Washington : Government Printing Office, 1904.


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PART III.—EXECUTIVE ORDERS RELATING TO INDIAN RESERVES.
Arizona | California | Colorado | Idaho | Indian Territory | Iowa | Kansas | Michigan | Minnesota | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Mexico | North Dakota | Oklahoma | Oregon | South Dakota | Utah | Washington | Wisconsin | Wyoming

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ARIZONA

Camp Grant Reserve.
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
BOARD OF INDIAN COMMISSIONERS,
Camp Grant, Ariz.,, September 18, 1871.

SIR: The boundaries of the reservation selected with the approval of the President and Secretary of the Interior and Secretary of War, at Camp Grant, Arizona Territory, within the limits of which all peaceably-disposed Arivapa, Pinal, and other roving bands of Apache Indians are hereafter to be protected, fed, and otherwise provided, will be as follows.

Bounded north by the Gila River; west by a line 10 miles from and parallel to the general course of the San Pedro River; south by a line at right angles to the western boundary, crossing the San Pedro 10 miles from Camp Grant; east by a line at right angles to the southern boundary, touching the western base of Mount Turnbull, terminating at the Gila River, the northern boundary.

Citizens who have built or are now working ranches within the above-described boundaries will be allowed to remain to secure their crops and care for their property, until further orders from Washington, D. C., provided they conform to the laws prescribed by Congress for the government of Indian reservations. A copy of the laws and regulations governing this as well as all other Indian reservations will be forwarded to you on my return to Washington.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
VINCENT COLYER,
Commissioner.

Lieut. ROYAL E. WHITMAN, U. S. A.,
      In charge Indian Reservation, Camp Grant, Ariz.

(For other correspondence relating to this reserve and Executive order of November 9, 1871, and also for order restoring same to the public domain, see “White Mountain Reserve.”)


Camp Verde Reserve.
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
BOARD OF INDIAN COMMISSIONERS,
Camp Verde, Ariz.,, October 3, 1871.

GENERAL: Having personally inspected the country and condition of the Apache Mohave Indians on the Verde River, above the post, and finding the Indians to be, in considerable numbers, destitute and

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in a starving condition, having no boundaries defining their homes, their country overrun by hunters who kill their game, and not unfrequently kill the Indians—gold prospectors and others, none of whom locate in this section of country—agreeably to the powers conferred upon me by the President, and communicated to me in the letter of the Secretary of the Interior dated July 21, 1871, and the orders of the Secretary of War of July 18 and 31, 1871, and in harmony with the humane action of Congress in providing funds for this purpose, I have concluded to declare all that portion of country adjoining on the northwest side of and above the military reservation of this post on the Verde River for a distance of 10 miles on both sides of the river, to the point where the old wagon road to New Mexico crosses the Verde, supposed to be a distance up the river of about 45 miles, to be an Indian reservation, within the limits of which all peaceably-disposed Apache Mohave Indians are to be protected, fed, and otherwise cared for, and the laws of Congress and Executive orders relating to the government of Indian reservations shall have full power and force within the boundaries of the same, unless otherwise ordered by Congress or the President.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
VINCENT COLYER, Commissioner

BVT. MAJ. GEN. C. GROVER,
      Commanding Camp Verde, Ariz.

(For further correspondence relating to this reserve, and Executive order of November 9, 1871, see “White Mountain Reserve.” post page 812.)


EXECUTIVE MANSION, April 23, 1875.

All orders establishing and setting apart the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, in the Territory of Arizona, described as follows: “All that portion of country adjoining on the northwest side of and above the military reservation of this [Camp Verde] post, on the Verde River, for a distance of 10 miles on both sides of the river to the point where the old wagon road to New Mexico crosses the Verde, supposed to be a distance up the river of about 45 miles,” are hereby revoked and annulled; and the said described tract of country is hereby restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.


Chiricahua Reserve.
(For Executive order of December 14, 1872, setting apart this reserve, see “White Mountain Reserve,” post page 812.)

EXECUTIVE MANSION, October 30, 1876.

It is hereby ordered that the order of December 14, 1872, setting apart the following-described lands in the Territory of Arizona as a reservation for certain Apache Indians, viz: Beginning at Dragoon Springs, near Dragoon Pass, and running thence northeasterly along the north base of the Chiricahua Mountains, to a point on the summit of Peloncillo Mountains, or Stevens Peak Range; thence running south-easterly along said range through Stevens Peak to the boundary of New Mexico; thence running south to the boundary of Mexico; thence running westerly along said boundary 56 miles; thence running north-

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erly, following substantially the western base of the Dragoon Mountains, to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, canceled, and said lands are restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.


Colorado River Reserve.
[In the Colorado River Agency; occupied by the Chemehuevi, Walapai, Kowia, Cocopa, Mohave, and Yuma tribes; area, 376 square miles; established by act of March 3, 1865 (13 Stat., 559), and following Executive orders.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION, November 22, 1873.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country in the Territory of Arizona be withdrawn from sale and added to the reservation set apart for the Indians of the Colorado River and its tributaries, by act of Congress, approved March 3, 1865 (U. S. Stat. at Large, vol. 13, p. 559), viz: All that section of bottom-land adjoining the Colorado Reserve, and extending from that reserve on the north side to within 6 miles of Ehrenberg on the south, bounded on the west by the Colorado River, and east by mountains and mesas.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, November 16, 1874.

It is hereby ordered that a tract of country embraced within the following-described boundaries, which covers and adds to the present reservation, as set apart by act of Congress approved March 3, 1865 (Stat. at Large, vol. 13, p. 559), and enlarged by Executive order dated November 22, 1873, viz:

Beginning at a point where the La Paz Arroyo enters the Colorado River, 4 miles above Ehrenberg; thence easterly with said Arroyo to a point south of the crest of La Paz Mountain; thence with said crest of mountain in a northerly direction to the top of Black Mountain; thence in a north westerly direction across the Colorado River to the top of Monument Peak, in the State of California; thence southwesterly in a straight line to the top of Riverside Mountain, California; thence in a southeasterly direction to the point of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and set apart as the reservation for the Indians of the Colorado River and its tributaries.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 15, 1876.

Whereas an Executive order was issued November 16, 1874, defining the limits of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, which purported to cover, but did not, all the lands theretofore set apart by act of Congress approved March 3, 1865, and Executive order dated November 22, 1873; and whereas the order of November 16, 1874, did not revoke the order of November 22, 1873, it is hereby ordered that all lands withdrawn from sale by either of these orders are still set apart for Indian purposes; and the following are hereby declared to be the boundaries of the Colorado River Indian Reservation in Arizona and California, viz:

Beginning at a point where La Paz Arroyo enters the Colorado River and 4 miles above Ehrenberg; thence easterly with said Arroyo to a point south of the crest of La Paz Mountain; thence with said mountain crest in a northerly direction to the top of Black Mountain; thence in a northwesterly direction over the Colorado River to the top of

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Monument Peak, in the State of California; thence southwesterly in a straight line to the top of Riverside Mountain, California; thence in a direct line toward the place of beginning to the west bank of the Colorado River; thence down said west bank to a point opposite the place of beginning; thence to the place of beginning.

U. S. GRANT.


Gila Bend Reserve.
[Pima Agency; occupied by Papago tribe; area 35 square miles.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION, December 12, 1882.

It is hereby ordered that the following tract of country in the Territory of Arizona, viz, township 5 south, range 5 west, Gila and Salt River meridian, excepting section 18 thereof, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement and set apart for the use and occupancy of the Papago and other Indians now settled there, and such other Indians as the Secretary of the Interior may see fit to settle thereon.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

(See Papago.)


Gila River Reserve.
[In Pima Agency; occupied by Maricopa and Pima tribes; area 558 square miles; established by act of February 28, 1859 (11 Stat., 401), and Executive orders, for which see “Pima and Maricopa Reserve,” post p. 806.]


Hualpai [Walapai] Reserve.
[In Walapai Agency; occupied by Walapai tribe; area 1,142 square miles.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION, January 4, 1883.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country situated in the Territory of Arizona be, and the same is hereby, set aside and reserved for the use and occupancy of the Hualpai Indians, namely: Beginning at a point on the Colorado River 5 miles eastward of Tinnakah Spring; thence south 20 miles to crest of high mesa; thence south 40 degrees east 25 miles to a point of Music Mountains; thence east 15 miles; thence north 50 degrees east 35 miles; thence north 30 miles to the Colorado River; thence along said river to the place of beginning; the southern boundary being at least 2 miles south of Peach Spring, and the eastern boundary at least 2 miles east of Pine Spring. All bearing and distances being approximate.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


EXECUTIVE MANSION,
Washington, May 14, 1900.

It is hereby ordered that the northwest quarter (NW. ¼) of section fifteen (15) in township twenty-three (23) north of range thirteen (13) west, Gila and Salt River base and principal meridian, in Arizona, conveyed to the United States by quitclaim deed of the Santa Fe Pacific Railroad Company dated September 12, 1899, be and the same is hereby set apart, subject to certain exceptions, reservations, and conditions made by said company as set forth in the deed aforesaid, for Indian school purposes for the Hualapai Indians as an addition to section ten (10) of the township and range above mentioned, set aside by Executive order dated December 22, 1898, and designated therein as the “Hualapai Indian School Reserve.”

WILLIAM MCKINLEY.

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Hualapai Indian School Reserve.
EXECUTIVE MANSION, December 22, 1898.

It is hereby ordered that section 10, township 23 north, range 13 west, Arizona, be, and the same is hereby, set apart as a reservation for Indian school purposes for the Hualapai Indians, to be known as the “Hualapai Indian School Reserve.”

WILLIAM MCKINLEY.


Moqui (Hopi) Reserve.
[In Navajo Agency; occupied by the Moqui (Hopi) tribe; area 3,863 square miles.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION, December 16, 1882.

It is hereby ordered that the tract of country in the Territory of Arizona lying and being within the following-described boundaries, viz, beginning on the one hundred and tenth degree of longitude west from Greenwich, at a point 36 degrees and 30 minutes north, thence due west to the one hundred and eleventh degree of longitude west, thence due south to a point of longitude 35 degrees and 30 minutes north, thence due east to the one hundred and tenth degree of longitude, and thence due north to place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from settlement and sale, and set apart for the use and occupancy of the Moqui and such other Indians as the Secretary of the Interior may see fit to settle thereon.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


Navajo Reserve.
[In Navajo Agency; occupied by Navajo tribe; area 12, 029 square miles.]

For order relating to part of Navajo reserve in Arizona, and Utah, see New Mexico, post page 875.


Papago Reserve.
[In Pima Agency; occupied by Papago tribe; area 43 square miles; established by act of August 5, 1882 (22 Stat., 299), and following Executive order.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION, July 1, 1874.

It is hereby ordered that there be withdrawn from sale or entry and set apart for the use of the Papago and such other Indians as it may be desirable to place thereon, the following tract of country around San Xavier del Bac, in Arizona, viz:

Beginning at the northeast corner of section 9, township 15 south, range 13 east; thence west one-half mile to the quarter-section corner; thence south 3 miles to the section line between sections 21 and 28 of same township; thence west along north boundary of sections 28, 29, and 30, up to the northwest corner of section 30, same township, continuing thence due west 9 miles to a point; thence south 7 miles to a point; thence east 3 miles to the southwest corner of section 30, township 16 south, range 12 east; thence east along the south boundary of sections 30, 29, 28, 27, 26, and 25, township 16 south, range 12 east, and sections 30, 29, 28, 27, 26, and 25, township 16 south, range 13 east, to the southeast corner of section 25, same township; thence north along the range line between ranges 13 and 14 east to the northeast corner of section 24, township 15 south, range 13 east;

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thence west to the northwest corner of section 22, same township; thence north to the place of beginning, to be known as the Papago Indian Reserve.

U. S. GRANT.

(See Gila Bend, ante page 804.)


Pima and Maricopa or Gila River Reserve.
[In Pima Agency; occupied by Pima and Maricopa tribes; area 558 square miles; established by act of February 28, 1859, and Executive orders.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION, August 31, 1876.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described lands in the Territory of Arizona, viz, township 4 south, range 7 east, sections 14, 15, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, north half of section 35 and section 36; township 5 south, range 7 east, northeast quarter of section 1; township 4 south, range 8 east, southwest quarter of section 19, west half and southeast quarter of section 29, sections 30, 31, 32, and southwest quarter of section 33; township 5 south, range 8 east, southwest quarter of section 3, section 4, north half of section 5, north half of northeast quarter and northwest quarter of section 6, and northwest quarter of section 10, be, and the same are hereby, withdrawn from the public domain and set apart as an addition to the Gila River Reservation in Arizona for the use and occupancy of the Pima and Maricopa Indians.

U. S. GRANT


EXECUTIVE MANSION, January 10, 1879.

It is hereby ordered that all the public lands embraced within the following boundaries lying within the Territory of Arizona, viz, commencing at the mouth of the Salt River, running thence up the Gila River to the south line of township No. 2 south, Gila and Salt River base-line; thence east with said line to the southeast corner of township No. 2 south, range 6 east; thence north with said line to a point 2 miles south of the Salt River; thence following the course of said stream in an easterly direction, and 2 miles south of the same, to the west line of the White Mountain Reservation; thence north with the line of said reservation, or the extension of the same, to a point 2 miles north of said river; thence in a westerly direction, following the course of said river, and 2 miles north of the same, to the east line of range 6 east; thence north with said line to the northeast corner of township 2 north, range 6 east; thence west with the north line of said township to the Gila and Salt River meridian line; thence south with the said line to the Gila River, and thence by the said river to the place of beginning, be, and the same are hereby, withdrawn from sale and set apart for the use of the Pima and Maricopa Indians, in addition to their present reservation in said Territory.

R. B. HAYES.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 14, 1879.

In lieu of an executive order dated January 10, 1879, setting apart certain lands in the Territory of Arizona as a reservation for the Pima and Maricopa Indians, which order is hereby canceled, it is hereby ordered that there be withdrawn from sale and settlement and set apart for the use of said Pima and Maricopa Indians, as an addition to the reservation set apart for said Indians by act of Congress approved February 28, 1859 (11 Stat., 401), the several tracts of

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country in said Territory of Arizona lying within the following boundaries, viz:

Beginning at the point where the range-line between ranges 4 and 5 east crosses the Salt River; thence up and along the middle of said river to a point where the easterly line of Camp McDowell military reservation, if prolonged south, would strike said river; thence northerly to the southeast corner of Camp McDowell reservation; thence west along the southern boundary-line of said Camp McDowell reservation to the southwest corner thereof; thence up and along the west boundary line of said reservation until it intersects the north boundary of the southern tier of sections in township 3 north, range 6 east; thence west along the north boundary of the southern tier of sections in township 3 north, ranges 5 and 6 east, to the northwest corner of section 31, township 3 north, range 5 east; thence south along the rangeline between ranges 4 and 5 east to the place of beginning.

Also all the land in said Territory bounded and described as follows, viz:

Beginning at the northwest corner of the old Gila Reservation; thence by a direct line running northwesterly until it strikes Salt River 4 miles east from the intersection of said river with the Gila River; thence down and along the middle of said Salt River to the mouth of the Gila River; thence up and along the middle of said Gila River to its intersection with the northwesterly boundary line of the old Gila Reservation; thence northwesterly along the said last-described boundary line to the place of beginning.

It is hereby ordered that so much of townships 1 and 2 north, ranges 5 and 6 east, lying south of the Salt River as are now occupied and improved by said Indians, be temporarily withdrawn from sale and settlement until such time as they may severally dispose of and receive payment for the improvements made by them on said lands.

R. B. HAYES.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 5, 1882.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described lands, situated in the Territory of Arizona, viz:

Beginning at a point where the south boundary of section 15, township 3 south, range 3 east, intersects the western boundary of the present reservation south of the Gila River; thence west along the south boundary of sections 15 and 16, township 3 south, range 3 east, to the southwest corner of section 16; thence north along the section line to the northwest corner of section 16; thence due west along the south boundary of sections 8 and 7, in township 3 south, range 3 east, and sections 12, 11, and 10, in township 3 south, range 2 east, to the southwest corner of section 10; thence north along the west boundary of sections 10 and 3, to the northwest corner of section 3, in township 3 south, range 2 east; thence west along the north boundary of said township to the southwest corner of section 33, in township 2 south, range 2 east; thence north along the west boundary of sections 33 and 28 to the northwest corner of section 28; thence northwest in a straight line to a point on the Gila River meridian 2 miles south of the initial point on the Gila River base line; thence north along the Gila River meridian to the middle of the Gila River; thence with the boundary of the present reservation along and up the middle of the Gila River to a point where the said boundary leaves the said river; thence continuing along said boundary south 18° 38' east to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement, and set apart for the use of the Pima and Maricopa Indians, in addition to their present reservation in said Territory: Provided,

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however, That any tract or tracts of land included within the foregoing described boundaries the title to which has passed out of the United States Government, or to which valid homestead and pre-emption rights have attached under the laws of the United States, prior to the date of this order, are hereby excluded from the reservation hereby made.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, November 15, 1883.

It is hereby ordered that the tract of country in the Territory of Arizona embraced within the following-described boundaries, which covers and adds to the present reservation as set apart by act of Congress approved February 28, 1859 (11 Stats., 401), and Executive orders dated August 31, 1876, June 14, 1879, and May 5, 1882, viz, beginning at a point in the middle of Salt River 4 miles east from the intersection of said river with the Gila River, being the northeast corner of the Executive addition of June 14, 1879; thence southeasterly along the boundary line of said Executive addition to the township line between townships 1 and 2 south, range 2 east of the Gila and Salt River meridian; thence east on the township lines between townships 1 and 2 south to the northeast corner of township 2 south, range 4 east; thence south on the range line between ranges 4 and 5 east to the southeast corner of township 2 south, range 4 east; thence east on the township lines between townships 2 and 3 south to the northeast corner of township 3 south, range 6 east; thence south on the range line between ranges 6 and 7 east to the southeast corner of township 3 south, range 6 east; thence east on the township lines between townships 3 and 4 south to the quarter-section corner on the north boundary of section 3, township 4 south, range 8 east; thence south through the middle of sections 3, 10, 15, 22, 27, and 34, in township 4 south, range 8 east, and section 3, in township 5 south, range 8 east, to the northeast corner of the present reservation as established by Executive order dated August 31, 1876, being the northeast corner of the southwest quarter of section 3, township 5 south, range 8 east; thence following the boundary line of said reservation southwest and north to the northeast corner of section 2, township 5 south, range 7 east; thence south on the section lines to the southeast corner of section 11, in township 5 south, range 7 east; thence west on the section lines through ranges 7, 6, and 5 east to the southwest corner of section 7, township 5 south, range 5 east; thence north on the range line between ranges 4 and 5 east to the northwest corner of section 18, township 4 south, range 5 east; thence west on the section lines through ranges 4, 3, and 2 east to the southwest corner of section 7, township 4 south, range 2 east; thence north on the range line between ranges 1 and 2 east to the northwest corner of section 19, in township 2 south, range 2 east; thence west on the section lines through range 1 east to the southwest corner of section 18, township 2 south, range 1 east on the Gila and Salt River meridian; thence north on the Gila and Salt River meridian to a point in the Gila River opposite the middle of the mouth of Salt River; thence up the middle of Salt River to the place of beginning, as approximately represented on the accompanying diagram, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement and set apart for the use and occupancy of the Pima and Maricopa Indians: Provided, however, That any tract or tracts of land included within the foregoing-described boundaries the title of which has passed out of the United States Government, or to which valid homestead or pre-emption rights have attached under the laws of the United States prior to the date of this order, are hereby excluded from the reservation hereby made.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

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Salt River Reserve.

(See Pima and Maricopa or Gila River Res., Ex. order June 14, 1879, ante p. 806.)


Suppai (Havasupai) Reserve.
[Occupied by Suppai [Havasupai] tribe; area, 60 square miles.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 8, 1880.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described country, lying within the boundaries of the Territory of Arizona, viz, beginning at a point in the middle of Cataract Creek, 2 miles below the lowest fall, south of the settlement of the Suppai Indians; thence due east 2 ½ miles; thence in a northerly direction 12 miles to a point 2 ½ miles due east of the middle of said creek; thence due west 5 miles; thence in a southerly direction 12 miles to a point 2 ½ miles due west of the middle of said creek; thence due east 2 ½ miles to the place of beginning, to embrace the settlements and improvements of the Suppai Indians, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement, and set apart for the use and occupancy of said Suppai Indians.

R. B. HAYES.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, November 23, 1880.

It is hereby ordered that the following described country, lying within the boundaries of the Territory of Arizona, viz:

Beginning at a point in the middle of Cataract Creek, 2 miles below the lowest fall north of the settlement of the Suppai Indians; thence due east 2 ½ miles; thence in a southerly direction 12 miles to a point 2 ½ miles due east of the middle of said creek; thence due west 5 miles; thence in a northerly direction 12 miles to a point 2 ½ miles due west of the middle of said creek; thence due east 2 ½ miles to the place of beginning, to embrace the settlements and improvements of the Suppai Indians, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement, and set apart for the use and occupancy of said Suppai Indians, and the Executive order dated June 8, 1880, withdrawing from sale and setting apart a reservation for said Indians, is hereby revoked.

R. B. HAYES.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 31, 1882.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described country lying within the boundaries of the Territory of Arizona, viz, so much of the bottom land of the cañon of Cataract Creek, bounded by walls of red sand-stone on the east and west, as is included within certain lines, viz, on the south, an east and west line (magnetic) crossing said cañon at a narrow pass marked by a monument of stone, placed in the summer of 1881, by Lieut. Carl Palfrey, of the Corps of Engineers of the Army, about 2 miles above the village of the Yavai Suppai Indians, and on the north, a line bearing N. 55° E. (magnetic) crossing said cañon at the crest of the third falls of Cataract Creek, and marked by Lieutenant Palfrey, by two monuments of stone, one on each side of the stream, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement, and set apart for the use and occupancy of said Yavai Suppai Indians, and the Executive order dated November 23, 1880, withdrawing from sale and settlement and setting apart a reservation for said Indians, is hereby revoked.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

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Walapai Reserve.

(See Hualapai.)


White Mountain or San Carlos Reserve.
[Formerly called White Mountain or Camp Apache Reserve. Occupied by Arivaipa, Chilion, Chiricahua, Coyotero, Membreno, Mogollon, Mohave, Pinal, San Carlos, Tonto, and Yuma-Apache tribes; area 2,866 square miles; established by Executive orders, acts of February 20, 1893 (27 Stat., 469), and June 10, 1896 (29 Stat., 358).]

ENGINEERS’s OFFICE,
HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE PACIFIC,
San Francisco, Cal., January 31, 1870.

SIR: I respectfully forward the following description of the proposed Indian reservation in Arizona; the boundaries of the reservation to be as follows, as shown in red on the accompanying map: Starting at the point of intersection of the boundary between New Mexico and Arizona with the south edge of the Black Mesa, and following the southern edge of the Black Mesa, to a point due north of Sombrero or Plumoso Butte; then in the direction of the Picache Colorado to the crest of the Apache Mountains, following said crest down the Salt River to Pinal Creek, and then up the Pinal Creek to the top of the Pinal Mountains; then following the crest of the Pinal range, “the Cordilleras de la Gila,” the &ldqu#147;Almagra Mountains,” and other mountains bordering the north bank of the Gila River, to the New Mexican boundary near Steeple Rock; then following said boundary north to its intersection with the south edge of the Black Mesa, the starting-point.

H. M. ROBERT,
Major Engineers.

General W. D. WHIPPLE,
      Adjutant-General Military Division of the Pacific.


DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
BOARD OF INDIAN COMMISSIONERS,
Camp Apache, Arizona Territory, September 5, 1871.

SIR: As the White Mountain region has been set apart by the War Department as an Indian reservation, and there are several bands of peaceably disposed Apaches, who have for many years lived in this country, who can not be removed without much suffering to themselves, risk of war and expense to the Government, I have concluded to select the White Mountain Reservation, the boundaries of which were defined in letter of H. M. Robert, major of Engineers, dated Headquarters Military Division of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal., January 31, 1870, as one of the Indian reservations upon which the Apache Indians of Arizona may be collected, fed, clothed, and otherwise provided for and protected, agreeable to the power conferred upon me at the suggestion of the President by the honorable Secretary of the Interior, under date July 21, 1871, and supplementary orders July 31, 1871, copies of which are herewith inclosed.

Agreeable to your wish that I should name the articles and amount of provisions to be issued, I would suggest that one pound of beef and one pound of corn per capita be issued with salt daily, and sugar and coffee occasionally.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
VINCENT COLYER, Commissioner.

Lieut. Col. JOHN GREEN,
      First Cavalry U. S. A., Commanding
            Camp Apache, Arizona Territory.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
BOARD of INDIAN COMMISSIONERS,
Washington, D. C., November 7, 1871.

SIR: Reservations for the roving Apache Indians of New Mexico and Arizona were selected under your instructions of 21st July, 1871, as follows:

For the Mimbres and Coyoteros at Tularosa Valley,a in New Mexico. (See accompanying paper A.)


a   For the Executive order setting apart Tularosa Valley Reserve see New Mexico, post page 878.

For the Coyoteros and Chiloccos of Arizona, at Camp Apache, in White Mountains, Arizona. (See Appendix B.)

For the Arrivapis and Pinals, at Camp Grant, Arizona. (See Appendix C and accompanying map.)

For the Mohave Apaches, at Camp Verde, Arizona. (See Appendix D.)

A detailed description of the Camp Apache Reservation, which was established by Major-General Thomas, will be found on file in the War Department.

I also requested, with the advice of General Crook and the several post commanders, that temporary asylums, where the Tontos, Hualapais, and Western band of Apache Mohaves might be protected and fed, should be established at Camp McDowell, Beal Spring, and Date Creek, until such times as the Indians collected there could be removed to the above reservations.

Very respectfully, etc.,
VINCENT COLYER.

Hon. C. DELANO,
Secretary of the Interior, Washington, D. C.


DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
Washington, D. C., November 7, 1871.

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of a communication addressed to this Department by the Hon. Vincent Colyer, one of the board of Indian peace commissioners who recently visited Arizona, wherein he states his views in relation to the Apache Indians, and describes certain tracts of country in Arizona and New Mexico which, during his recent visit to said Indians, he has selected to be set apart as reservations for their use, as authorized to do by orders issued to him before visiting the Apaches.

I have the honor to recommend, in pursuance of the understanding arrived at in our conversation with the Secretary of War on the 6th instant, that the President issue an order authorizing said tracts of country described in Mr. Colyer’s letter to be regarded as reservations for the settlement of Indians until it is otherwise ordered. *    *    *

I would further suggest that the War Department will, for the present, select some suitable and discreet officer of the Army to act as Indian agent for any of the reservations in Arizona which may be occupied by the Indians, under the order herein contemplated. Such agents will be superseded by persons hereafter appointed by this Department, at such times as the President may hereafter deem proper.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
C. DELANO, Secretary.

The PRESIDENT.

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These recommendations were approved by the President as follows:

EXECUTIVE MANSION,
Washington, D. C., November 9, 1871.

Respectfully referred to the Secretary of War, who will take such action as may be necessary to carry out the recommendations of the Secretary of the Interior.

U. S. GRANT.

And indorsed by General Sherman thus:

HEADQUARTERS, ARMY of the UNITED STATES,
Washington, D. C., November 9, 1871.

GENERAL: I now inclose you copies of a correspondence between the Secretary of the Interior and War Department on the subject of the policy that is to prevail in Arizona with the Apache Indians. The Secretary of War wishes you to give all the necessary orders to carry into full effect this policy, which is the same that prevails in the Indian country generally, viz: to fix and determine (usually with the assent expressed or implied of the Indians concerned) the reservation within which they may live and be protected by all branches of the Executive Government; but if they wander outside they at once become objects of suspicion, liable to be attacked by the troops as hostile. The three reservations referred to in these papers, and more particularly defined in the accompanying map, seem far enough removed from the white settlements to avoid the dangers of collision of interest. At all events these Indians must have a chance to escape war, and the most natural way is to assign them to homes and to compel them to remain thereon. While they remain on such reservations there is an implied condition that they should not be permitted to starve, and our experience is that the Indian Bureau is rarely supplied with the necessary money to provide food, in which event you may authorize the commissary department to provide for them, being careful to confine issues only to those acting in good faith, and only for absolute wants.

The commanding officer of the nearest military post will be the proper person to act as the Indian agent until the regular agents come provided with the necessary authority and funds to relieve them; but you may yourself, or allow General Crook to appoint these temporary agents regardless of rank.

The citizens of Arizona should be publicly informed of these events, and that the military have the command of the President to protect these Indians on their reservations, and that under no pretense must they invade them, except under the leadership of the commanding officer having charge of them.

The boundaries of these reservations should also be clearly defined, and any changes in them suggested by experience should be reported, to the end that they may be modified or changed by the highest authority.

After general notice to Indians and whites of this policy, General Crook may feel assured that whatever measures of severity he may adopt to reduce these Apaches to a peaceful and subordinate condition will be approved by the War Department and the President.

I am, your obedient servant,
W. T. SHERMAN, General.

Gen. J. M. SCHOFIELD,
Commanding Military Division Pacific.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, December 14, 1872.

It is hereby ordered that the following tract of country be, and the same is hereby, withheld from sale and set apart as a reservation for

{Page 813}

certain Apache Indians in the Territory of Arizona, to be known as the “Chiricahua Indian Reservation,” viz:

Beginning at Dragoon Springs, near Dragoon Pass, and running thence northeasterly along the north base of the Chiricahua Mountains to a point on the summit of Peloncillo Mountains or Stevens Peak range; thence running southeasterly along said range through Stevens Peak to the boundary of New Mexico; thence running south to the boundary of Mexico; thence running westerly along said boundary 55 miles; thence running northerly, following substantially the western base of the Dragoon Mountains, to the place of beginning.

It is also hereby ordered that the reservation heretofore set apart for certain Apache Indians in the said Territory, known as the “Camp Grant Indian Reservation,” be, and the same is hereby, restored to the public domain.

It is also ordered that the following tract of country be, and the same is hereby, withheld from sale and added to the White Mountain Indian Reservation in said Territory, which addition shall hereafter be known as the “San Carlos division of the White Mountain Indian Reservation,” viz:

Commencing at the southeast corner of the White Mountain Reservation as now established, and running thence south to a line 15 miles south of and parallel to the Gila River; thence west along said line to a point due south of the southwest corner of the present White Mountain Reservation; thence north to the said southwest corner of the aforesaid White Mountain Reservation, and thence along the southern boundary of the same to the place of beginning; the said addition to be known as the “San Carlos division of the White Mountain Reservation,” which will make the entire boundary of the White Mountain Reserve as follows, viz:

Starting at the point of intersection of the boundary between New Mexico and Arizona with the south edge of the Black Mesa, and following the southern edge of the Black Mesa to a point due north of Sombrero or Plumoso Butte; thence due south to said Sombrero or Plumoso Butte; thence in the direction of the Piache Colorado to the crest of the Apache Mountains, following said crest down the Salt River to Pinal Creek to the top of the Pinal Mountains; thence due south to a point 15 miles south of the Gila River; thence east with a line parallel with and 15 miles south of the Gila River to the boundary of New Mexico; thence north along said boundary line to its intersection with the south edge of the Black Mesa, the place of beginning.

U. S. GRANT.


DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
Washington, D. C., July 30, 1873.

Respectfully submitted to the President, with the recommendation that all that portion of the valley of the Gila River in the Territory of Arizona hitherto included in the San Carlos division of the White Mountain Indian Reservation as established by Executive order dated December 14, 1872, lying east of and above the site of old Camp Goodwin, be restored to the public domain, as recommended by the Acting Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

B. R. COWAN, Acting Secretary.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, August 5, 1873.

Agreeable to the above recommendation of the Acting Secretary of the Interior, it is hereby ordered that the land therein described be restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.

{Page 814}

EXECUTIVE MANSION, July 21, 1874.

It is hereby ordered that all that portion of the White Mountain Indian Reservation in Arizona Territory lying east of 109 degrees 30 minutes west longitude be restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, April 27, 1876.

It is hereby ordered that all that portion of the White Mountain Indian Reservation in Arizona Territory lying west of the following-described line, viz: Commencing at the northwest corner of the present reserve, a point at the southern edge of the Black Mesas, due north of Sombrero or Plumoso Butte; thence due south to said Sombrero or Plumoso Butte; thence southeastwardly to Chromo Peak; thence in a southerly direction to the mouth of the San Pedro River; thence due south to the southern boundary of the reservation, be, and the same hereby is, restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, October 30, 1876.

It is hereby ordered that the order of December 14, 1872, setting apart the following-described lands in the Territory of Arizona as a reservation for certain Apache Indians, viz, beginning at Dragoon Springs, near Dragoon Pass, and running thence northeasterly along the north base of the Chiricahua Mountains to a point on the summit of Peloncillo Mountains, or Stevens Peak Range; thence running southeasterly along said range through Stevens Peak to the boundary of New Mexico; thence running south to the boundary of Mexico; thence running westerly along said boundary 56 miles; thence running northerly, following substantially the western base of the Dragoon Mountains, to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, canceled, and said lands are restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, January 26, 1877.

It is hereby ordered that all that portion of the White Mountain Indian Reservation in Arizona Territory lying within the following-described boundaries, viz: Commencing at a point known as corner I of survey made by Lieut. E. D. Thomas, Fifth Cavalry, in March, 1876, situated northeast of, and 313 chains from, flag-staff of Camp Apache, magnetic variation 13 degrees 48 minutes east; thence south 68 degrees 34 minutes west, 360 chains, to corner II, post in monument of stones, variation 13 degrees 45 minutes east; thence south 7 degrees 5 minutes west, 240 chains, to corner III, post in monument of stones, variation 13 degrees 43 minutes east; thence north 68 degrees 34 minutes east, 360 chains, to corner IV, post in monument of stones, magnetic variation 13 degrees 42 minutes east; thence north 7 degrees 15 minutes east, 240 chains, to place of beginning, comprising 7,421.14 acres, be restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 31, 1877.

It is hereby ordered that all that portion of the White Mountain Indian Reservation in the Territory of Arizona lying within the following-described boundaries be, and the same hereby is, restored to the public domain, to wit: Commencing at a point at the south bank of the Gila River where the San Pedro empties in the same; thence up and along the south bank of said Gila River 10 miles; thence due south to the southern boundary of the said reservation; thence along the southern boundary to the western boundary thereof; thence up said western boundary to the place of beginning.

R. B. HAYES.

{Page 815}

Yuma Reserve.

(For order relating to Yuma Reserve in Arizona, see California, post page 831.)


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